Thank you, thank you to all you Sketchnoters who came to the class Saturday and helped refine it. I learned a lot!

What we did

Here’s my original class map. All the components are there but with your feedback, we moved some stuff around. See if this seems familiar and if you can follow it.

Here’s the current facilitator guide which includes the lectures and the beginning principles. It will change based on your very valuable input, but for now you can use it to keep going. The wide margins are for you to draw in.

Sketchnoting 102 for sharing

Take it further

Here’s one more process for developing your Sketchnoting ability. Go to a site that has both transcripts and podcasts. Here’s a link to the NPR transcript page:
http://www.npr.org/templates/search/index.php?&sort=match&searchinput=transcript

  1. Read through the transcript to get an idea of the subject and the points covered.
  2. See if you can determine a structure that underlies  the entire talk.
  3. Print out the transcript. Use a pen to highlight the main points. Pull them out from the details.
  4. Think about what image conveys the idea of each point to you. Maybe even sketch a few.
  5. Pick one pen. Leave any other colors or lines alone for now.
  6. Play the podcast and try to Sketchnote it.  Do it all in one go. Leave room around your images so that you can go back and add points in if you missed something important. Remember, you’re capturing what’s important to you, not the entire talk.
  7. Go back and re-illustrate. Look for relationships and call them out on your page. Frame groups of ideas with fancy frames. You can also add color at this point.

Shared Symbollary

Another outcome from the class. I have created a shared album in Picasa that we can use to build our Symbollary. I have scanned the “fussy” images and added the ones that I created for the facilitator guide. I have also tagged a few. You can upload too. Make sure that you tag your images.

Sketchnoting exercise

Here’s a concept to draw for the day.

Did you know that . . .

There are three conditions that foster insight: preparation, incubation and the off-conscious state that usually accompanies an intuitive leap. . . Most creative people know the value of putting their work aside and turning to something else for awhile.

Robert H. McKim — Experiences in Visual Thinking

What will you draw?

Where shared Sketchnoting makes sense

Or, the next stage of Sketchnoting — shared visual thinking.

One of you said at the end of the class that you could see using Sketchnoting in shared project scoping. BRILLIANT!

If you want other ideas on where this kind of work makes sense, just look at the Table of Contents for David Sibbet’s book Visual Meetings. He’s got loads of ideas. (And it’s a great book.)